Puppy Proofing Your Home

In December 10, 2012
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Doc pup- Endless Mt. LabradorsFolks who have had babies in their homes know about making the home safe for children. For those who have had no children, just get down at a puppy’s level and remove or safeguard everything they can  possibly see and everything for about 5 feet up, anything near chairs, tables, sofas, etc.  Prevention is worth a pound of cure.   Here are some things you can do to make sure your home is safe for your new puppy.

  1. Secure electrical outlets and cords. Everything goes in puppy’s mouth…..that’s how they learn about the world. Make sure electrical cords are secured to baseboards or inaccessible to the pup. Puppies chewing on wires can suffer electric shock burns or die.   The same goes for TV cables, computer cables.
  2. Keep medication bottles or cleaners out of the puppy’s way, secured in a closed cabinet. Child proof does not mean puppy proof containers because puppies can chew through the bottle.
  3. Keep your puppy away from toxic plants, both in and out of the house. Here’s a list of known harmful plants that can cause illness from mild to deadly. Autumn crocus, Azaleas, Bleeding Heart, Buttercups, Castor bean, Daffodil, Dutchman’s Breeches, Elderberry, Foxglove, Golden Chain, Hyacinth, Iris, Japanese Yew, Jack-In-the-Pulpit, Larkspur, Lily of the Valley,Mistletoe, Narcissus, Oleander, Poinsettia, Rhubarb, Rhododendrons, just about any kind of bulb and beware those peach and cherry pits!
  4. Use pesticides and rodent poisons with caution and make sure that the puppy cannot get to them. Rat baits are sometimes mixed with grains and can be attractive to pets. Same with boxes or plastic packages…..puppy could try to play with them and ingest the contents!
  5. Don’t invite other dogs over to your house unless your puppy has had all his vaccinations If friends do come over make sure their are folk who are meticulous about the health of their pets!
  6. Don’t leave cigarettes or butts on the table or in the ashtrays.Puppies could eat them and get nicotine poisoning.
  7. Watch out for Christmas ornaments, tinsel, and other decorations. Broken Christmas balls can lead to nasty cuts, and metallic tinsel can cause poisoning.   Other decorations may be toxic, as well..
  8. Don’t leave candles burning where puppies can touch them. Puppies are curious creatures and can get burned.
  9. Keep the toliet lid down if you use cleaners.They may be alkaline and tempting for the puppy or dog to drink.
  10. Dispose of bones so that puppy cannot get to them. Puppies will attracted to the smell in the trash can and ingested bones can be deadly.
  11. Don’t leave sewing needles or pins out. Something else for those nosy pups to put in their mouths!
  12. Antifreeze is out of reach and drippings are cleaned up immediately! Sweet tasting antifreeze is deadly to pups.
  13. Be careful not to use flea collars, dips or other preparations on pups under 15 weeks. Check with and follow your veterinarian’s recommendations for flea control on young dogs.

In case of an accident, have your veterinarian’s phone number posted by the phone!

 

3 Comments

  1. Great, useful tips!

    1. Glad to hear that! 🙂

      1. Great information. Dear Theo is the love of my life, but………..I can’t put away my kitchen walls, floors and woodwork. Yes !!! He has taken chunks out of all these materials. I have hardwood floors in the kitchen, he has chewed on the floor. The wall and woodwork have chunks taken out. He crates beautifully, so all these little chunks are my own fault for giving him the run of the kitchen. I hear he will continue this chewing until about 3 years of age. He is 11 months right now. I hope I live long enough to see this “puppy” grow up. 🙂

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